Don’t Call Me Special: A First Look at Disability

Posted on 16. Sep, 2010 by Rise and Recline Chair in rise and recline chair

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10 Responses to “Don’t Call Me Special: A First Look at Disability”

  1. Lin

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by Lin for Don’t Call Me Special: A First Look at Disability
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    I love this book. First I’d like to point out that this is a children’s book – for children. Don’t Call Me Special is intended for the typical child audience. The title itself is refreshing and pulls away from the idea that “Special Needs” children are different. We donate this book to our childrens’ school libraries and have asked and been granted that our county libraries carry this book. This book is not a book about specific disabilities or about rights for your child. This information can be found in other books, at your local support group, through state agencies and your local schools. What this book DOES do is open dialog for elementary school typical children. We read this book in many of our childrens’ elementary school classrooms. The first thing that the book points out to children is that we are all different and that each of us has things we are good at and things we need help with (and to not assume things just because a person has a disability). The secondary lesson is to explain why children who have disabilities get help and what some of that help is. I feel this information helps demystify where children with disabilities go if and when they leave the classroom and why they get additional help in school. To me, reading this book in the classrooms with typical students helps those students realize that having a disability is no big deal. This book is not intended to help those with disabilities. The book is intended to help typical children address concerns they have for students they share a classroom with that may have learning or physical disabilities. Get this book and use it as a tool to open up a great discussion!

  2. Betina Ferreira

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by Betina Ferreira for Don’t Call Me Special: A First Look at Disability
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    I think this book is very important to be read in a class!!! This book shows that everyone has his own “problem” and we can live all together!! I have a daughter with muscular dystrophy and a “normal” son, and I always teach them that everyone is special in his own way!!!

  3. Charlotte Rogers Methodist Church

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by Charlotte Rogers Methodist Church for Don’t Call Me Special: A First Look at Disability
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    With our new state regulations this will be perfect! The book was even better than I though it was going to be. Thanks so much

  4. dcp

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by dcp for Don’t Call Me Special: A First Look at Disability
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    I’m sure you’ve all heard the expression “Don’t judge a book by it’s cover”. Well that’s just what I did this time and it was a mistake. It was the title that fooled me. I am a person with disabilities and I hated being called special as a kid. Now I’m a childcare professional for children with and without disabilities and I thought this book might come in handy. Unfourtunately I found it very disapointing. The information is way too general and there’s no real story. There’s no central character or plotline for the intended audience (preschool/early elementary) to relate to. When I was asked to read this book to an inclusive kindergarten class, I completely lost their attention after 3 pages. I honestly found the book to be a little patronizing for them and for me. (especially the “how to use this book” page in the back)There are much better children’s books out there about disabilities. Don’t waste your money on this one.

  5. Joseph Johnson

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by Joseph Johnson for Don’t Call Me Special: A First Look at Disability
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    The problem with books like this is they do not address the problem of dealing with disabilities in he Real World.

    Unlike a book such as Greg Perry’s Disabling America: The Unintended Consequences of the Government’s Protection of the Handicapped, Don’t Call Me Special is more of a reactive book instead of a proactive book that teaches children – and more importantly PARENTS – how to cope in society and how to give your kids the VERY BEST CHANCE AT SUCCESS no matter what challenges they may face.

    I doubt it was the author’s intent, but this book is almost like a “feel good about yourself and that you’re different” and focuses on self-esteem, etc., without giving any guidance on the best way for parents and their disabled children to have the best chance to be happy and content AND, yes, successful however you define it.

    If a feel-good-about-yourself book is important to you, this will probably work. But if you want answers, you need to look elsewhere. The first place to find the answers is in Perry’s Disabling America: The Unintended Consequences of the Government’s Protection of the Handicapped – be warned – it’s a caustic book that pulls no punches about problems with the ADA, etc. But do you want answers or not? Don’t you want the VERY BEST FOR YOUR CHILD? It’s a prescriptive book.

    Once you get a better perspective there on today’s world of disability problems and how your kids can copy not only better but FAR better, then you need to check some NLP titles such as PsychoCybernetics. It’s not psycho-babble in spite of the title, it’s a general approach that allows anyone to overcome their challenges.

  6. Douglas M. Smith

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by Douglas M. Smith for Nolo’s Guide to Social Security Disability: Getting & Keeping Your Benefits
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    As a lawyer I recommend three books to individuals who ask for help in getting their Social Security disability benefits. First is our Disability Workbook for Social Security Applicants. Everyone tells me that this book greatly simplifies getting disability benefits. I can testify that interviewing a client is much easier when he or she has used the Disability Workbook. Second, the book How to Get SSI and Social Security Disability, by Mike Davis, is insightful and easy to read. Mr. Davis is a former disability examiner. His clear explanations of common bureaucratic problems make his book one of my favorites. Finally, I use Dr. David Morton’s Nolo’s Guide to Social Security Disability. Dr. Morton is a former disability determination services staff physician who describes Social Security medical decision making better than anyone else I know. Every doctor who communicates with Social Security about patients should have Dr, Morton’s book on the shelf – and every disability lawyer. I give all three books the highest rating.

  7. Calaveras-cutie

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by Calaveras-cutie for Nolo’s Guide to Social Security Disability: Getting & Keeping Your Benefits
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    Bought this book as part of prep for application for ssdi. (also bought how to get ssi and ssdi by mike davis and dis workbook for ss applicants by doug. smith). Each book explained a diff part of the ssdi process. This book told what each med diagnosis needed to establish to qualify for perm. disability. And it goes on to explain how to keep your ssdi once you get your award. I did win my case the first try using the info in the 3 books. Having them made all the diff in the world in understanding the ssdi process. Best $[money]. (all 3 books) I ever spent…

  8. Molly

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by Molly for Nolo’s Guide to Social Security Disability: Getting & Keeping Your Benefits
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    I would have given this book a five star rating, but it did not include two important SSA forms. The forms are sent to a claimant when his/her file is sent to the state office for development. These two forms are SSA-3373-BK (Function Report- Adult) and SSA-3380-BK (Function Report-Adult-Third Party). The two forms have to do with your Activities of Daily living, and when received have a 10 day return time. The forms can be found on the net, but you have to know they exist.

  9. MotherLodeBeth

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by MotherLodeBeth for Nolo’s Guide to Social Security Disability: Getting & Keeping Your Benefits
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    This is an excellent book of the whole area of Social Security Disability benefits and how to fill the forms out completely, when to seek an attorney for appeals etc, and a rather extensive section on what the term disability means to Social Security and what diseases, conditions etc qualify and which do not. The only area lacking was disabled spousal Social Security Disability coverage, which a spouse under age 50 with no minor children must file for in the same way the working spouse who becomes disabled would have to do. I plan on donating my copy which I bought via Amazon.com to my local public library.

  10. Anonymous

    16. Sep, 2010

    Review by for Nolo’s Guide to Social Security Disability: Getting & Keeping Your Benefits
    Rating:
    Filing for Social Security Disability benefits is not easy. This guide explains EVERYTHING in easy to understand terms. I wish I had ordered it before the first denial. I am using this book while filing a reconsideration. The suggestions provided have really opened my eyes to the process. I highly recommend this book to people who want a little extra information on the SSA’s thought process when going over your application.